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61
Need help with your Italian? / Re: Rain
« Last post by Agent Orange on September 25, 2014, 04:43:13 PM »
Not interchangeable.

Piovere is the infinitive of the verb, " to rain "  so:  piove means it's raining.  And the gerund piovendo.  Sta piovendo also means " it's raining "
Pioggia is the noun " rain " common use " sotto la pioggia - " in the rain "
Piove a catinelle   - it's pissing down  ( anglo-saxon colloq   !!
62
Need help with your Italian? / Rain
« Last post by levissima on September 25, 2014, 04:05:00 PM »
Piovere or pioggia, can anyone give examples of when to use these different words for rain? Or are they interchangeable?
63
Need help with your Italian? / Similar but not the same
« Last post by levissima on September 21, 2014, 12:53:19 PM »
Ordinare = to order
Ordinario = ordinary


Sometimes it helps just to stick an 'o' on the end :D
64
Need help with your Italian? / Re: Relations
« Last post by Relaxed on September 18, 2014, 06:14:44 PM »
Nipote, nipoti, is - of course - from the same linguistic root as nepotism. (However, I don't think Zio has any connection with Zionism - but I could be wrong.)
65
Need help with your Italian? / Re: Relations
« Last post by stefanaccio on September 18, 2014, 12:29:18 PM »
The word that always gets me is "ospite" which means both a host or a guest.  Go figure....
66
Need help with your Italian? / Re: Relations
« Last post by maritodi on September 18, 2014, 09:52:28 AM »
I am actually more confused when the language is used in reverse to this, when a word has many meanings.

For example the simple word 'a' has so many meanings: to, by, at, in, of, on, from, for, etc etc etc

Then there are other small words that mean the same things and they seem to use them in context. I find this more confusing than verbs!!  :o
67
Need help with your Italian? / Re: Relations
« Last post by nil satis on September 18, 2014, 09:26:32 AM »
My Italian is poor at best but when my neighbour says  'il mio nipote' it has always confused me and he refers to second cousins the same
68
Need help with your Italian? / Re: Relations
« Last post by Design Witch on September 18, 2014, 09:22:57 AM »
I am now wondering if my housekeeper is expecting my 4 grandchildren this weekend. Ages 7 years, 5 years, 20 months & 1 year. All with their personal Trunkies & tiny shades.  :D :D :D
69
Need help with your Italian? / Re: Relations
« Last post by Tartufa on September 18, 2014, 09:16:28 AM »
Sometimes you get 'nipotino / a' for grandchildren but I agree - massively confusing.  There are plenty of other examples where they have one word and we have two.  Tartaruga can mean tortoise or turtle (but you can specify dell'aqua o della terra), orologio is clock or watch, gemelli / e means twins or triplets or quads (basically multiple birth of any size), lo dito is a finger or a toe (specify della mano o del piede).  Conversely, we use some more generic terms while they are more precise such as soup for minestra, brodo or zuppa etc. 

What a nice morning diversion for a word nerd like me!  Thanks Levi :)
70
Need help with your Italian? / Relations
« Last post by levissima on September 18, 2014, 08:36:54 AM »
In a country where family ties are so important I find it really confusing that there is one word which means niece, nephew, granddaughter and grandson. So when I'm told that so and so is " il mio nipote" I require further information. Is it just round here or is there no way to differentiate between a nephew and a grandson?
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