Please register if you want to contribute!

Author Topic: Jamie Oliver channel 4  (Read 707 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline levissima

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2829
Jamie Oliver channel 4
« on: August 21, 2018, 06:41:48 PM »
Jamie is back on tv touring Italy and I believe this time heís going to cover Abruzzo as well!!

The format is that he gets Nonne to cook their traditional local dishes, then creates one of his own loosely based on theirs. ( I always prefer the nonna version!)

One interesting thing is to watch the Italians cutting vegetables, they donít cut on a board but in their hands. Iíve been trying this myself and itís quite nice to have slightly less regular vegetables and itís easy to get bite sized pieces. And Iíve still got all my fingers😃


Offline Rustychain

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 274
Re: Jamie Oliver channel 4
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2018, 07:00:48 PM »
Looking forward to seeing it; I really enjoy his 'Jamie's Italy' book. I wonder if he'll call in on Civitella Casanova, home of the arrosticini?!

One thing that bugs me about Italian cooking is the "serve with spaghetti, never with linguine" or "if you don't make it like my grandmother did, you're doing it all wrong". The whole culture around it generally seems stuck in the past to me, with exceptions of course.
In Abruzzo since March 2013

Offline Lui

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 132
Re: Jamie Oliver channel 4
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2018, 12:01:59 AM »
Oh dear, is this cultural appropriation?  :D :D :D :D

Offline Relaxed

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 494
Re: Jamie Oliver channel 4
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2018, 11:01:01 PM »
I dunno - I think it's all a storm in a teacup!
There were a couple of perfectly nice West Indians on Newsnight saying that the problem with Jamie's jerk rice (?) was that it was completely un-authentic, lacking essential ingredients, and therefore not as described. Nothing political about it, (in their opinion) simply mis-selling.

Which brings me on to Rustychain. Grrr! There are very good reasons to associate many pasta sauces with one particular pasta format - all you need to do to prove this is to make a sauce containing peas and try to serve it with anything other than conchiglie! Then (Italian nonne) can discourse for hours about whether spaghetti (for those useless daughters in law who don't make their own pici) should be extruded using a bronze mould rather than the 'cheapo' stainless steel. And the arguments about whether penne should be rigate or liscio can go on for days. And of course - they are always right.

Except when Rana come up with their 'worldwide' range of tortellini - and they become best-sellers. If you haven't tried this one, I totally recommend it. The chilli con carne isn't so good, and the paella version is disappointing unless you get a prawn, but the chicken curry version is delicious. (All very tongue in cheek)

Offline Rustychain

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 274
Re: Jamie Oliver channel 4
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2018, 10:37:06 AM »
Relaxed; I'm not a complete heathen....  ;D I wasn't suggesting that any pasta would go with any sauce; there are limits after all. But I stand by my point that the Italians take it to extremes. For those recipes that call for long thin pasta, does is really matter if I use spaghetti or linguine or fettucini or tagliatelli? Not to me, but it does to Italians.

The point I was trying to make is that I see them as being very backward-looking re their cuisine, forever invoking Nonna-this or Nonna-that; the cuisine is very slow to develop. In the same way, they, as a nation, have been very slow (relative to most of the rest of the world) to embrace other cuisines. This is reflected in the incredibly low % of ethnic restaurants in Italy & also in the ethnic ingredients available in the supermarkets, although I admit this situation is improved, even since we came out here 5.5 years ago.
In Abruzzo since March 2013

Offline GeordieBorn

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 328
Re: Jamie Oliver channel 4
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2018, 11:20:28 AM »
We have found food to the Italians is like the weather to the brits, but even more important. I was almost of the same opinion as Rusty when we first arrived here, but have since changed my mind. They do know their food/produce to the nth degree and are almost all experts as to whether or not some produce is exactly ripe/good/fresh or not. I believe they are just about the same with the finished product i.e. the meal, but there it does somewhat come down to how nonna made it!

Offline old timer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 73
Re: Jamie Oliver channel 4
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2018, 02:12:04 PM »
I think most non Italians do not realise how regional food is in italy. My wife comes from the  campania region. Although they are only the other side of the mountains there ďkitchenĒ is very different. Whenever our abruzzo neighbours come for dinner my wife always cooks non abruzzo food. Mainly recipes from campania  and we have never had a complaint and always clean plate. We have even invited italian friends for a full English breakfast. The bacon etc was brought out from the uk. We have also done a English roast lamb dinner with Welsh leg of lamb, mint sauce  and parsnips and all the trimmings. We have als made shepards pie. They do Have a great reluctance to try different food. I think you will find the more traveled people are the more they will accept different food.  The further north you go the more non italian food you can find. I remember going to a Chinese restaurant in Siena more than 30 years ago and it was busy.  Change will come eventually in the south. I for one hope it will be slow  in changing the food.

Offline levissima

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2829
Re: Jamie Oliver channel 4
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2018, 05:42:22 PM »
I used to think the Italians were bonkers about their finicky use if pasta, itís Pasta, who cares what shape it is! But now, weíll ive gone native and I only realised when I saw pipe rigate ( not commonly found in my supermarket) and bought 4 packs because itís the best for tuna, pasta salad!

Poor old Jamie is making a programme so I guess heís duty bound to come up with his own recipe and some may be more successful than others but if you donít try, you never find out.

I also think itís a shame that food fashion changes and some things are lost, I like prawn cocktail on shredded lettuce, oh, and cheese and pineapple on sticks!

Offline Rustychain

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 274
Re: Jamie Oliver channel 4
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2018, 07:06:07 PM »
I like cheese and pineapple on sticks!

I'd keep that to yourself if I were you.  ;D

In Abruzzo since March 2013

Offline GeordieBorn

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 328
Re: Jamie Oliver channel 4
« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2018, 08:40:27 PM »
I like cheese and pineapple on sticks!

I'd keep that to yourself if I were you.  ;D
... no I would go with the  cheese and pineapple on sticks and add olives if allowed ;D

Offline Relaxed

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 494
Re: Jamie Oliver channel 4
« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2018, 11:46:17 PM »
I shall ignore the cheese and pineapple ...
oldtimer is spot on with regional differences in Italian cuisine - I have a Sardinian friend who is a very good cook (and quite ghastly about 'his way is the only way') but he introduced me to a spaghetti dish which involves only grated zucchini, plus saffron. Light and delicious, and saffron costs pennies here.
But Italians WILL experiment when they are eating at the houses of friends. I have found that yorkshire pudding (especially toad in the hole) goes down a storm, but even more bizarre is that southern American 'grits' are universally appreciated (by Italians, personally I'm less than convinced ...)
Around me there has been an explosion in Japanese restaurants - they are incredibly popular (as much as you can eat for Ä10 at lunchtime is maybe the reason, and the jug wine is cheap) - and the posey thing to do is to eat using chopsticks, which more than half the restaurant manages. (I feel very inadequate using a fork).
But I do love the regional differences - Atri where the 'lasagne' (I'm sure it has a local name) is made with pancakes rather than pasta; the differences in the consistency of polenta, how 'salami' is such a different beast from Calabria to Friuli, and it would be a tragedy if these traditions fell by the wayside. So, annoying as Nonna can be, I'll say more power to her elbow.