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Author Topic: Best areas of Abruzzo to retire to for quality of life and weather?  (Read 11533 times)

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Offline stefanaccio

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Re: Best areas of Abruzzo to retire to for quality of life and weather?
« Reply #75 on: September 24, 2014, 12:33:19 PM »
...The other half of our house - a historic church built on the pilgrim's route up to the Monastry of Vallabone , founded by Pope Celestine V in 1124, is falling apart. We asked the brother's who own it (5) if we could buy it to restore with our house and unite the 2 parts of the church (separated in 1860) 2 will not sell and now there are cousins who have left Abruzzo ! So an important part of the towns history will just decay. A story repeated all over Abruzzo.

If you visit Pineto you'll find this fabulous house which has been left unoccupied since 1999 much to the disgust of local residents who are trying to get the council to take action. Silvi Marina (Cement city) and Pineto have many of these lovely late 1800's Villas all about to lose their rooves and collapse. Why not restore them and improve the whole area?

I am not saying these things because I hate Abruzzo or Italy -the exact opposite is true -I don't usually quote Prince Charles but the cementification of Abruzzo is like ' a monstrous carbuncle on the face of an old friend'.

There is a rather simple answer to the problem of so many abandoned houses in Abruzzo (my village of 300 has a couple dozen or more).    The Italians would do well to lower the taxes on labor and, simultaneously, raise taxes on real property.   This would have two beneficial eftects: 1) make Italy more competitive while simultaneously encouraging folks to once again invest in businesses, and 2) encourage people to sell off their unused/underdeveloped properties to someone who would put them to better use.   If the (many) owners of an abandoned house had to pay out a couple hundred euors/year/@ they would be up in arms (a good thing) and would think hard about whether they wanted to perpetually hold on to and pay for an essentially worthless investment.   


Offline levissima

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Re: Best areas of Abruzzo to retire to for quality of life and weather?
« Reply #76 on: September 24, 2014, 01:00:01 PM »
...The other half of our house - a historic church built on the pilgrim's route up to the Monastry of Vallabone , founded by Pope Celestine V in 1124, is falling apart. We asked the brother's who own it (5) if we could buy it to restore with our house and unite the 2 parts of the church (separated in 1860) 2 will not sell and now there are cousins who have left Abruzzo ! So an important part of the towns history will just decay. A story repeated all over Abruzzo.

If you visit Pineto you'll find this fabulous house which has been left unoccupied since 1999 much to the disgust of local residents who are trying to get the council to take action. Silvi Marina (Cement city) and Pineto have many of these lovely late 1800's Villas all about to lose their rooves and collapse. Why not restore them and improve the whole area?

I am not saying these things because I hate Abruzzo or Italy -the exact opposite is true -I don't usually quote Prince Charles but the cementification of Abruzzo is like ' a monstrous carbuncle on the face of an old friend'.

There is a rather simple answer to the problem of so many abandoned houses in Abruzzo (my village of 300 has a couple dozen or more).    The Italians would do well to lower the taxes on labor and, simultaneously, raise taxes on real property.   This would have two beneficial eftects: 1) make Italy more competitive while simultaneously encouraging folks to once again invest in businesses, and 2) encourage people to sell off their unused/underdeveloped properties to someone who would put them to better use.   If the (many) owners of an abandoned house had to pay out a couple hundred euors/year/@ they would be up in arms (a good thing) and would think hard about whether they wanted to perpetually hold on to and pay for an essentially worthless investment.

The problem is the inheritance laws here in Italy. If granny dies and her rustic old house is then inherited by her seven children, spread all over the world probably, all of them have to agree to sell and agree the price. Old uncle Gianini, now living in New York, has fond memories of his childhood and grannies house and doesn't want to sell. The house sits empty, while the family argue. In the end it's a ruin that no one wants to buy, or is worth so little it's hardly worth the effort. The imposition of IMU on second homes now means that grannies house will be costing money and may encourage the family to sell but they are now trying to sell in a bad market, many more houses and fewer buyers.

If the comune's weren't so strapped for cash they might be able to intervene and buy up abandoned properties but it costs a lot more to tastefully renovate an old property than to throw up a concrete block of flats to house those in need of accommodation.

Offline Caerus

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Re: Best areas of Abruzzo to retire to for quality of life and weather?
« Reply #77 on: September 24, 2014, 01:48:44 PM »
There is a rather simple answer to the problem of so many abandoned houses in Abruzzo (my village of 300 has a couple dozen or more).    The Italians would do well to lower the taxes on labor and, simultaneously, raise taxes on real property.   This would have two beneficial eftects: 1) make Italy more competitive while simultaneously encouraging folks to once again invest in businesses, and 2) encourage people to sell off their unused/underdeveloped properties to someone who would put them to better use.   If the (many) owners of an abandoned house had to pay out a couple hundred euors/year/@ they would be up in arms (a good thing) and would think hard about whether they wanted to perpetually hold on to and pay for an essentially worthless investment.


I agree. In my area of Canada the average homeowner pays about 2000 dollars per year in home taxes. If the taxes are not paid for a number of years (not sure how many but probably about 5) the local government will take the property and sell it. Any monies left after the taxes are paid will be given to the owners. If they can't be found the money is held and eventually the government takes that too. Consequently there are very few abandoned houses.

Offline Relaxed

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Re: Best areas of Abruzzo to retire to for quality of life and weather?
« Reply #78 on: September 24, 2014, 07:39:23 PM »
We bought a house we like in a place we like - Simple.  I cannot imagine that anyone here drove a thousand miles to buy a house they didn't like. What's to discuss?


That's an extremely good comment. Two points come to mind: once you've bought the house which you liked, you're going to manage to not see any of the downsides, and if you don't see a house which you like (which fitted all your criteria) you might be being too fussy  ;) .


If you do find something you like, that's the point when you need to research it - for sunlight, exposure, transport links, altitude, toxic waste, closeness to bar (in no particular order) etc. Then you can reject it if necessary.

Offline dolcevita

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Re: Best areas of Abruzzo to retire to for quality of life and weather?
« Reply #79 on: September 25, 2014, 09:33:48 AM »
I think the idea of the commune buying is great and we did meet one sindaco who did just that but they were advertising the houses on an Estate Agents site.

Maybe VV could comment on this as a way of saving some of these lovely old houses?

We would love it if our commune could buy the stone house attached to us and we could then buy from them. Many other buyers from outside of Italy would be delighted if this could come about as it would save the cost of tracing all those far flung relatives only to find 1 will not sell!
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Offline linsead oil

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Re: Best areas of Abruzzo to retire to for quality of life and weather?
« Reply #80 on: September 25, 2014, 09:55:15 AM »
somwere in italy the comune were selling house for a silly sum abut a houndred eros or so cat remember exact

under the condition you done them up and lived in them  for so many years  a dam good idiar

Offline Vignaverde

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Re: Best areas of Abruzzo to retire to for quality of life and weather?
« Reply #81 on: September 25, 2014, 10:25:51 AM »
It is a nightmare when there are beautiful houses and no one knows the owner but I do not think anyone should be forced to sell unless they do not pay their bills, if Zio Mario wants to hold on to a bit of his childhood who are we to say no, families often do not sell in the hope that one of the future generation will decide to do it up and live there and sometimes they do.

The only time the council will really do something is if the property starts to cause problems to surrounding ones or is a danger to people on the street, if people complained about falling tiles etc etc  they may find things start to move a little, I have seen this happen in our town.

Yesterday I went to Ancona (Le MArche) and if I was not in so much of a rush I would have stopped in a town close to the motorway with a huge water tower in the middle of it, it reminded me so much of this thread.
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Offline Shebar

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Re: Best areas of Abruzzo to retire to for quality of life and weather?
« Reply #82 on: September 26, 2014, 03:42:01 PM »
Just spotted this ...

http://www.beppegrillo.it/en/2014/09/minister_maurizio_lupis_unbrea.html

.... which seems to reflect some of the concerns here.