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Author Topic: Anyone know what this is?  (Read 1543 times)

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Offline levissima

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Anyone know what this is?
« on: February 03, 2017, 10:31:33 AM »


I've been given this. It's dried but is edible, sweet with hard little seeds inside. Apparently the seeds can be planted and will produce a tree which is evergreen and has small dark leaves. The fruit is also used to make flour.

The person who gave it to me only knows the dialect word for it, which comes up zero on google.


Offline Hagbean

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2017, 01:45:44 PM »
Hi L
What was the dialect word you were given?  Maybe someone on the forum will know from that.
HB

Offline Braveheart

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2017, 03:15:17 PM »
I think it may be a carob the seed pods definitely look like that.

Offline Shebar

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2017, 05:18:13 PM »

Offline levissima

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2017, 05:50:38 PM »
Yes that's what it is, well done braveheart! She'd never seen the dialect word written down so no idea how to spell it, lots odd sh's though😃

Offline Orbito

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2017, 06:07:36 PM »
Ahhh I wonder if I might have some too, I thought I had runner beans a few months ago - same shape but hard as nails and felt like there were seeds inside. Looked like a pic of an unripened carob (thanks to Google) but was growing off a vine.

Must go and see if it survived the snow!
« Last Edit: February 03, 2017, 06:09:11 PM by Orbito »

Offline Sunshine

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2017, 09:42:03 AM »
My parents emigrated from Sicily to U.K. back in 1955. But I do recall as a nipper going back there on holiday, and asking the same question to my dad when I first saw these.

He said they were called 'carubbi', which is their dialect word for them. When I tried to eat them he stopped me and told me they we're used to feed their mule. But I do remember them being sweet when I had a bite!

At a time and in a place such as Sicily, where they lived a very simple life working the land, the mule was critical to them, and consequently well looked after. It was their mode of transport, and used for bringing back the produce they grew. Then it would be used to trek up and down the streets of the old town in order to sell the produce it carried on its back. The streets were narrow and densely lined with 4/5 story houses. My grandfather would stop on street corners and yell out (almost sing) his signature
sales pitch, and baskets on a rope would be lowered down from balconies up high. Goods were carried up, and money passed down and on he would go.

That's how a lot of trade for all sorts of products was done back then. It's a bit more romantic than having to buy straight carrots or unripe but perfectly formed strawberries from the supermarkets here in th UK!

Funny to see the 'carubbi' again though, brought back some old memories.

Offline Relaxed

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Re: Anyone know what this is?
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2017, 12:59:31 AM »
That's a lovely post from Sunshine!

When I first saw the photograph, I thought the seed pod looked as if it might have come from a Wisteria (glicine in Italian) - but the wisteria seed pods in my experience don't go 'brown', and though I've never bitten into one (!) I'm doubtful that they would taste sweet. (On the basis that if they had any nutritional value, even for a mule, my neighbours would have filched them!)

It's always my favourite section of this friendly forum - the 'will it grow' bit. Levi is going to have to ask her neighbour if l'abruzzesi dialect has a different dialect word for carubbi. They probably do....