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Author Topic: Freelance English Teachers  (Read 913 times)

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Offline Tartufa

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Freelance English Teachers
« on: November 24, 2016, 06:53:45 PM »
There are essentially 3 types of mother-tongue English teachers here: Those who are employed under contract by a local language school, those who work from home 'al nero', and those who are freelancers with a Partita IVA. I'm in the third category and there are not many of us around. Just in the last week I have turned down two potentially lucrative contracts for 2107 - one with a business and another with an elementary school - both in L'Aquila. I'm fully booked and unless they pay travel expenses on top of the hourly rate then it's not worth my while to travel from Sulmona. Shame. There's a demand here definitely. I'm the only teacher in category 3 here in a town of 25,000 people. Anyone out there a freelancer in the L'Aquila area?  Do you want to join my network?
www.welcometosulmona.com The only English language insiders' guide to Sulmona and the Valle Peligna.


Offline Marta

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Re: Freelance English Teachers
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2017, 07:07:12 PM »
Hi, a freelancer yes, but with the tax affairs still in Ireland. I can't decide whether to pursue this career or not - past 8 years I was working as a translator more than a teacher and I enjoy translation way more. On the other hand, my language pair is useless in Italy and it will take me another 5 years at least to master my Italian.... The market for qualified teachers must be good though, considering the level of teaching English at schools. If you don't mind, what qualification works best here? My qualification is in translation and here it's useless for teaching from what I've seen

Offline Tartufa

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Re: Freelance English Teachers
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2017, 07:56:06 AM »
Marta.  I'm a little confused by your post but here goes. I'm assuming you are still in Ireland?  Or at least not yet in Italy.  If you do move here then you will need to move your tax affairs here too.  (But that's a whole new post and I'm not going to go into that here...) Or maybe that's not what you are asking / stating.  I also work as a translator in tandem with an Italian partner. Translation can be done from anywhere - with any language pair - so long as you don't rely on local contacts.  We do work mainly with local contacts but that's because most of our work comes to us because I am a teacher and locals here think that being a teacher means you can also translate - not at all true.  The general rule is that you only translate into your mother tongue and not vice versa. Local schools don't employ foreign teachers directly as full-time members of staff though. In order to be 'di ruolo' in a school you need to have an appropriate Italian degree, pass the relevant 'concorso' (professional competition) and then enter the 'graduatoria' which is a list of eligible teachers each with their own 'score' according to how well they performed in the concorso and then number of years service etc. That graduatoria can send you to a different job every year far from home until you climb up the ladder.  So you can see that it does not really work for the likes of us.  To teach here you need a TEFL or a CELTA (preferably). Teaching and translating together works well but unless you work online (in both areas) then local contacts are essential and may take time to build up.  Which is why almost everybody starts as an employee in a private language school...  I hope this helps.
www.welcometosulmona.com The only English language insiders' guide to Sulmona and the Valle Peligna.

Offline Marta

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Re: Freelance English Teachers
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2017, 10:51:40 AM »
HI, sorry for the confusion. I'm already here in Italy - for the sake of clarification. Thank you for the advice, I'll have to have a look at CELTA and TEFL qualifications and how to get them. I just got totally shocked yesterday when my daughter (14, bilingual) brought a short text their English teacher wrote for one of her friends, for the exam at the end of scuola media. Never mind confusion with capitalization, or the calques. I had to re-write it all anew... It's shocking that people who are not able to put together 10 simple and correct sentences in English actually teach the kids. Shocking and sad. She's been teaching for over 30 years!

Offline Tartufa

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Re: Freelance English Teachers
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2017, 05:36:03 PM »
Sadly your experience with the level of English teaching by Italian teachers isn't that unusual. I do know some excellent teachers but not many. Iggle Piggle posted here recently about an opportunity to study for the CELTA here in Abruzzo.  Do bear in mind that for the better-paid contracts you do need a Partita IVA here..but that's a whole other ball game.
www.welcometosulmona.com The only English language insiders' guide to Sulmona and the Valle Peligna.

Offline Tartufa

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Re: Freelance English Teachers
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2017, 11:28:40 AM »
My annual post it seems:

Are you a self-employed, qualified & experienced, mother-tongue English teacher currently living in the Sulmona / Valle Peligna area? We are receiving more requests for single lessons and for groups than we can cope with - especially for school children needing classes in the afternoons. If you fit the bill, please do get in touch. If you know someone who might be interested, do please share this post. Please note that this is not an offer of employment - you need to be a well-connected, self-starter for this one ;)

My website is www.studysulmona.com

PS We do also get requests for French & German 'repetizioni'.  Not Spanish though...funnily enough  ;D
www.welcometosulmona.com The only English language insiders' guide to Sulmona and the Valle Peligna.